Meet the Super Cow

Meet the Super Cow

In the cow shed the man in charge of the beefer is Patrice Lobet. “Hmm, he’s a big fellow, am I all right?” “He is quite big, huh. He is 160 – 160 meter tall, yeah.” “If I saw a man like that I wouldn’t get as close to him I don’t think. I would think he was on steroids or something, I would think he was a bodybuilder.” “If he’s 100% natural whereby its within so many generation orbiters have taken the best of the best we move from a normal classical animal then we sell that sort of animal based on the “When you say double muscles do you mean it has two of every muscle?” “No.”
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“Because it looks like it, doesn’t it?” “The same type of muscle except that each of these muscles is far more developed. This cow is technically known as a Belgian Blue and it’s the product of selective breeding. Selective breeding is the first stop on our tour of how man is using science to control nature. It’s used by farmers to produce desirable characteristics in their animals. In fact, selective breeding is all about managing sex. To create these Belgian Blues over a hundred years, farmers have only allowed the cows and the bulls with the greatest muscle mass to mate. And the result is a bull that weighs over a ton.
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The animal’s breeders are keen to show off the results of their hard work. The bulls are shaved to best display their muscles.” In order to highlight all the muscle, you see.” “Oh, so you can see where all the meat is.” “Exactly, exactly. But even in here where they’ve sort of trimmed in there to highlight that muscle.” ”And these are all going to be lean cuts. They’re all for quick cooking. Because when you look at this you can’t help thinking of lunch, you know?” “Is it healthy.” “The animal you mean? The healthy is as healthy as another intensive-producing animal.” “So this is about the most technological that meat can get.” “Not the most technological.

In terms of technology we talk about selection; natural selection, having achieved that.” So what is the science behind the Belgian Blues. There is a gene that regulates the growth of muscles in cattle. These cows have been selectively bred from animals that contain a copy of this gene which doesn’t work. As a result, their muscles grow far larger than normal. To ensure the defective gene is passed on, sex for the Belgian Blues has been replaced by technology in the form of artificial insemination. “He is basically a sperm machine.” “He’s a sperm machine.” “Absolutely.” “It’s very early in the morning for…” “I understand.” “The semen is now collected, it’s in the artificial vagina.

And from there we process the semen in order to be able to process artificial insemination on the colt.” So precise is the technology involved they can analyze the semen sperm by sperm to choose the ones they want. “So this is testing the sperm count.” “That’s a sperm analyzer, it’s now checking let’s say the quality of the sperm we have been collecting this morning. Green is good because you see they are very mobile and they are looking forward to move towards the eggs.” “And these are not especially muscly sperm.”Don’t you find that they are very muscles?” “Well they look compressive to me but I’ve never seen any other sperm, they’re not.” “Visually you won’t see any difference, there is no way to find any difference between the [bovine, dequine] and the other species, no.