Lemon Sharks

Lemon Sharks

For more than forty years, marine biologist, Samuel Gruber has been researching the behavior of Lemon Sharks but he’s never seen anything like this. Dozens of them, huddled together on the bottom. Here off the coast of Jupiter, Florida, he is about to dive 80ft below to find out why. The water is murky. As Gruber gets deeper, its clear, he is not alone. A school of 3 dozen adult lemon sharks ready and waiting. Some are as long as 10 ft. An awesome sight, but it doesn’t stop Gruber from getting close enough to touch them. What are so many sharks doing at the same place at the same time? He believes the predators are displaying what he calls refugee behavior.
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httpv://nz.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCQ-KmBuBXE

They are out and about when sun goes down, they are out feeding moving around and when the sun comes up they beging to go to this particular place where they can assemble and rest on the bottom. Now resting on this bottom gives bit them of an energetic edge in the sense that they can face up into the current and they don’t have to swim to breathe.

But there maybe more to it than resting. Lemon sharks are social animals and school in small groups. This might also be a sort of mating game. The females are assembling here in order to attract males. That’s what I think is going on here. And the way it works I think is that early in December, a group of females who know to come here because they done it year after year will assemble at this sight.
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Grubers suspects female Lemon Sharks have chosen this reef as a place for producing chemical signals called pheromones. The pheromones are carried by the currents and they attract potential male suitors. And then its on to the domestic phase.

When this group reaches a critical mass, they around March or February, March, they being to move out and they move into the Lagoon for mating and birthing, which takes place in April through June. And if Gruber’s hunch is right he can expect another miracle soon, when these creatures bring a new generation of Lemon sharks into the ocean.